General Workers’ Compensation

FAQs: General Workers’ Compensation

Tom Ford Law provides a variety of commonly asked Rhode Island General Workers Compensation questions.

Why do I Need an Attorney?

2020-09-16T15:18:47+00:00

The attorney will educate you in your rights and will guide you through the Workers’ Compensation claim process. An attorney will work to ensure that you receive the maximum amount of monies and benefits that your injury or illness entitles you to.

Why do I Need an Attorney?2020-09-16T15:18:47+00:00

Who is Covered by workers compensation insurance?

2020-09-16T15:02:09+00:00

Rhode Island state law requires all employers with one or more employees, to carry Worker’s Compensation insurance. There are some exceptions: sole proprietors, partners, certain real estate, agricultural and domestic services’ employees are not covered. Different workers’ compensation programs serve federal employees, Police and Fire. You can check your employers status here https://www.ewccv.com/cvs/

Who is Covered by workers compensation insurance?2020-09-16T15:02:09+00:00

What is Workers Comp?

2020-09-16T15:17:22+00:00

Worker’s Compensation is a Rhode Island state mandated insurance program, funded by employers, to provide compensation (money and medical benefits) to employees that are injured as the result of an accident or occupational disease while performing their work duties. Read more…

What is Workers Comp?2020-09-16T15:17:22+00:00

What is the Worker’s Compensation Initial hearing?

2020-09-16T15:01:07+00:00

The injured employee and employer are not required to attend the Workers’ Compensation Initial Hearing if you have a lawyer. Its purpose is to permit the attorneys to notify the judge of what witnesses and any specific evidence that will be presented at trial.

What is the Worker’s Compensation Initial hearing?2020-09-16T15:01:07+00:00

How is my average weekly wage calculated?

2020-09-16T15:06:53+00:00

The average weekly wage (AWW) is calculated based on the 13 weeks wages prior to the week of injury. Add up the 13 weeks of wages and divide by 13 to calculate your AWW. (If applicable, overtime and bonuses are included) For part-time workers, the same methodology applies but uses 26 weeks.

How is my average weekly wage calculated?2020-09-16T15:06:53+00:00
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